Troubleshooting EMI Issues Caused by Structural Resonances

Most EMI issues are caused by a resonance that is excited somewhere in the system. It may be a resonance of a cable acting as an antenna or a heatsink energized by the power electronics switches bolted to it, becoming a good radiator. In this article, we look at the indicators that signal the presence of structural resonances and provide techniques for fixing the EMI issues. Practical case studies are presented to demonstrate the techniques.

Banana Skins – November 2022 (#411-414)

It has been reported widely in the Japanese press that electromagnetic interference caused by illegally modified transceivers on trucks is suspected of causing two accidents by disabling the braking system of commuter buses.

Understanding Preselection in EMI Receivers

In this comprehensive application note, you'll learn more about mixers and how they benefit your testing needs. You'll also go in-depth around preselection: What is it? Why is it important? Most importantly, you'll discover how applying this new information can save you time and money during your EMI testing.

Banana Skins – November 2022 (#404-410)

The Japanese National Institute of Technology and Evaluation has announced that they have confirmed that some of the household electrical heaters available in Japan malfunction when subjected to electrical disturbances.

Banana Skins – October 2022 (#397-403)

During the testing of one aircraft, we suffered a very marked and complete electrical failure of the aircraft (much to the alarm of both the test engineers and the cockpit crew) which turned out to be due to the EUT we were testing.

Cable Antennas and Ferrite Cores

In this column, the author offers a brief summary of a more systematic approach for using ferrite cores on cables. This summary can serve as a “ferrite core checklist” for design and test engineers.