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Researchers Pack Millions of Nanopores Together to Make a Battery

Researchers Pack Millions of Nanopores Together to Make a Battery | In Compliance Magazine

University of Maryland researchers have created single, tiny structures that when packed tightly together could lead to developments in shrinking energy storage components. The structures called nanopores are comprised of a small hole in a ceramic sheet. The hole holds an electrolyte that transfers an electrical charge between nanotube electrodes at the ends of the ceramic sheet.

Millions of these tiny thin nanopore batteries can be packed together to create a large battery, approximately the size of a postage stamp. The unique design of the nanopores allowed the researchers to create a larger battery because each nanopore is shaped exactly the same as others.  The researchers are working to increase the battery’s performance and develop strategies to mass produce the batteries.

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Watch a video that describes more about the development of nanopore battery.

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