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Hoverboard Uses Electromagnetic Fields to Float in Mid-Air

Hoverboard Uses Electromagnetic Fields to Float in Mid-Air | In Compliance Magazine

While developing a way for buildings to withstand earthquakes better, a California architect came up with an idea to use electromagnetic fields to separate a building from the ground during an earthquake. To further his idea, he started testing his theory using a board that would allow people to float in mid-air.

The hoverboard uses four engines that emit magnetic fields that push against each other, when the board is used on top of a conductive surface. The metal surface operates as a secondary magnetic field to keep the board floating. The board has been testing to hold up to 40 pounds, and the battery cell lasts approximately seven minutes.

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A Dash of Maxwell’s: A Maxwell’s Equations Primer – Part One

Solving Maxwell’s Equations for real-life situations, like predicting the RF emissions from a cell tower, requires more mathematical horsepower than any individual mind can muster. These equations don’t give the scientist or engineer just insight, they are literally the answer to everything RF.

Read more about the development of the hoverboard. 

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