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Cree Introduces Two New Discrete 650V SiC Rectifiers

Cree announced the addition of two new discrete 650V SiC rectifiers to its Z-Rec® Schottky diode portfolio. Built with Cree’s industry-leading SiC technology, these new devices deliver ultrafast switching frequencies, higher efficiencies, improved thermal characteristics, enhanced reliability, simplified circuit design, and reduced costs to power electronic systems.

Rated at 650V blocking voltage and 50A continuous forward current, Cree’s C5D50065D Schottky diode is the first member of Cree’s groundbreaking, high power CPW5 diode family to be released in packaged form. Available in a TO-247-3 package, the C5D5065D provides up to 2000A of non-repetitive surge capability at 25°C, combined with the high continuous current-carrying capability of the CPW5 family. The 50A rectifier is ideally suited for demanding applications, such as automotive on-board chargers, server power supplies, power conditioning, and high-reliability aerospace and military power systems.

Developed to provide increased switching efficiency through a reduced forward voltage, the CVFD20065A Schottky diode provides 20A of forward current capability with a nominal voltage drop of only 1.35V at 25°C and is the first product to be released as part of Cree’s new family of Low VF Z-Rec Schottky diodes. Cree has also taken additional steps to bolster the surge capability of the CVFD20065A, resulting in a forward surge rating of 1400A at 25°C (10µs pulse) – the highest among all commercially available 20A, 650V SiC Schottky diodes. The 20A rectifier is available in a TO-220-2 package and is rated for a blocking voltage of 650V. With its increased switching efficiency and exceptionally high surge capability, the new 20A diode was designed with HVAC power supplies and switched-mode power supplies (SMPS) in mind, but is also well suited for motor drives and power inverters operating in the 5-10kW range.

- Partner Content -

A Dash of Maxwell’s: A Maxwell’s Equations Primer – Part One

Solving Maxwell’s Equations for real-life situations, like predicting the RF emissions from a cell tower, requires more mathematical horsepower than any individual mind can muster. These equations don’t give the scientist or engineer just insight, they are literally the answer to everything RF.

For additional information, please visit www.cree.com/power

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